What is a simple sentence?

In this article, we'll talk about a simple sentence: we will give a definition of this syntactic construction, and also describe the types of simple sentences. Of course, in order to fully understand what simple sentences are, examples will also be needed, so we will always illustrate each type of proposal.

Which offer is simple?

Let's start with the definition immediately, and thenwe will explain it. What is a simple sentence? A simple sentence is a sentence that contains only one grammatical basis, consisting of the subject and / or the predicate. The subject and the predicate are the main members of the sentence and express, respectively, the subject of the action or agent and the action itself. It is clear that the subject is most often expressed by a noun or pronoun, and the predicate is expressed by a verb.

In the sentence "We go to the concert" "we" issubject, and "go" - the predicate. Together, the subject and the predicate, also called the main members of the sentence, form the so-called grammatical basis of the sentence. This sentence is an example of a simple sentence. The proposal "Birds fall to the south in the autumn" will be simple ("the birds fly away"), and, for example, the sentence "Winter came this year unexpectedly early: already in November severe frosts" are no longer simple, since there are two grammatical bases (" winter has come "and" frosts hit ").

Types of simple sentences

First, simple sentences cansubdivided into single-component and two-part. In the two-part sentence, there are both main terms (subject and predicate), and we have already seen examples of two-part sentences (see above). As for the second type of sentences, single sentences are called simple sentences, which contain only one of the main terms - either a subject or a predicate. So, in the sentence "I think about you" the subject "I" is omitted, however the meaning of the sentence is clear even without (with the help of the verb end). The same can be said about the proposal "They drove through the streets of the elephant ..." - it is clear that the subject of the action is available, but it is not expressed. So we gradually moved on to the types of simple one-part sentences. There are four in total.

  1. Definitely-personal. In this type of sentence, only the predicate is present, which can be expressed by the verb in the first or second person. The subject of the action is implied, but not called (it is easy to restore it by putting the desired pronoun). Examples: "I think about you"; "On the road we look around."

  2. Indefinite-personal. Here the predicate is expressed by the verb in the third person. Also, the subject of the action is not named, but it is available. Unlike the previous example, the subject of the action is not defined here, the emphasis is made more on the action than on the subject. Examples: "In the evening they do not walk here"; "They write beautifully in a notebook."

  3. Impersonal. In this type of sentence, the predicate is expressed by a verb in the so-called impersonal form. From examples, everything becomes clear to you: "It's going to be night"; "Settled."
  4. Called. In the call-out there is only a subject. Here is an example from a poem by the remarkable poet K. Balmont: "The forest clearings that looked into the lakes ...". Another example: "Morning.".

Also, simple sentences can be complete andincomplete. The complete sentence contains all the members of the sentence, and in the incomplete some are omitted. True, they are easily recovered from the context. Here is an example of an incomplete sentence: "Five" is the child's answer to the question: "What did you learn today in the Russian language?". From the context it is clear that both the subject and the predicate are omitted here, and in the full version the phrase would sound like this: "I got a five". If the child said so, then this would be a complete proposal. Incomplete sentences are found most often in colloquial speech.

And, finally, depending on the availability orthe absence of secondary members, a simple sentence can be common and uncommon. Unexplained sentences are sentences that contain only a grammatical basis. Example: "Swallows are back." Common proposals are sentences that, in addition to the grammatical basis, contain secondary members (definitions, circumstances, additions, introductory words, homogeneous terms, etc.). Example: "Swallows recently returned to our land".

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